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Category: Culture

A car even i could love …

A car even i could love …

It’s not fast; it does not have a huge range for battery … but

Quote: “The business plan, too, frames the Ami as a scooter replacement when it hits streets this June. You could buy it outright for $6,600, or you could lease it for $22 per month (with about $3,000 down), or rent it for 30 cents a minute with ride-share apps. The monthly lease is on par with current e-scooter subscriptions, though the minute-by-minute rate is about twice what the e-scooter company Bird is charging.”

https://www.fastcompany.com/90469594/this-tiny-electric-car-costs-just-22-a-month

Molly Tuttle’s 5 riffs

Molly Tuttle’s 5 riffs

She’s amazing to watch play the guitar … the guitar truly seems like an extension of her body and soul. Guitar Player has this series about the 5 riffs that changed your playing. Molly’s list is here

Clarence White, David Greer, David Rawlings and Joni Mitchell all are on the list. All of these I love to listen to …

I have been a long time fan of Clarence White’s playing both via Kentucky Colonels and the Byrds. David Greer, my once guitar teacher Eric Skye turned me on to Greer’s playing (I cannot even figure out how he gets that many tones from his guitars)! David Rawlings is one of my newer player loves that I can listen to all day long. — check this out. The soul Rawlings gets out of that old archtop floors me every time.

Molly fits within this group of players … as does Billy Strings. I love watching YouTube of these two playing together – mostly how they watch each other and get these huge smiles as the other crafts beautiful solos, for example …

Or for those non bluegrass lovers

Play on …

Grist advice – “avoid jargon!”

Grist advice – “avoid jargon!”

A corporate president I interfaced with often one time said to our team, “you have completely failed to understand the power of the English language.” How we use language has tremendous impact on what we can accomplish with other humans. Grist has some great advice!

Key words and their ‘non jargon’ explanation … which would you prefer to hear? (quoted below)

  • Carbon footprint: How much carbon-dioxide emissions can you attribute to a country, company, or maybe your neighbor? The answer is their carbon footprint.
  • Circular economy: A system where nothing really gets thrown away. In other words, your old smartphone gets broken up into its different parts and recycled — or more likely, you’re repairing it.
  • Climate adaptation: Improving our ability to cope with climate change. Think building sea walls, breeding crops that can tolerate droughts, and restoring the natural course of rivers. (See “resilience” below.)
  • Environmental justice: A phrase underscoring the broad idea that the people who did the least to cause climate change and pollution are the often the most at risk from the consequences.
  • Just transition: Shifting to an economy that runs on solar and wind energy without killing jobs.
  • Geoengineering: Using technology to try to counteract some of the warming caused by burning coal, oil, and gas. Like spraying tiny particles in the air to reflect the sunlight back into space so it doesn’t heat up the planet.
  • Net-zero: Canceling out the carbon dioxide we emit by making sure that the same amount gets sucked up by trees, plants, machines, or other things. (See: Offset.)
  • Offset: Something you buy that promises to cancel some or all of the carbon dioxide produced by, say, your next cross-country flight.
  • Resilience: Our ability to deal with climate change’s effects. Simply put, a more resilient New York City will be better able to withstand another Superstorm Sandy.
  • Sustainable: Using a resource in a way that won’t deplete it. Example: Making sure a forest has a bunch of new trees growing before you cut down an old one.
Dataset that only increases questions

Dataset that only increases questions

Infographic: Where U.S. Apartment Rents Are Rising Fastest | Statista

while this data is interesting, what was the baseline … just looking at changes w/out knowing the starting point renders an actionable inference impossible. This is not helpful, but still somewhat interesting to ask another set of questions

Jobs & automation in near future

Jobs & automation in near future

In reading a post about Janet Yellin’s recent interview, I ended up here – my most valued take-away from the post.

Here’s the reference section, quote: “Yellen referenced a McKinsey report on automation, artificial intelligence (AI), and the future of work that estimates about half of current jobs could be automated by new technologies. What happens to the people who are displaced? Many are likely to end up in low productivity jobs. And that, Yellen said, is “a scary prospect.”

Agree or disagree on the specifics or the particulars of skill sets or geography, the magnitude of the changes are probably not too far off … a tremendous inflection point.

Again, regardless of how accurate you believe these numbers and supporting details are, a dialogue is over due on contingency, mitigation and transition plans … a transition of this magnitude (people) takes time, and technology is consistently proving to transition faster! The only national level politician that spoke this narrative was Andrew Yang – I hope he re-enters the discussion soon!

Friday’s GD – “Touch of Grey”

Friday’s GD – “Touch of Grey”

Been a Grateful Dead fan since around 1972 when I was 13/14. Most Friday’s you will find me w/ some variant of Jerry’s genius filling my headphones and speakers …

Today’s hit: Touch of Grey (video)

Lyrics

Must be getting early, clocks are running late
Faint light of the mornin’ sky, looks so phony
Dawn is breakin’ everywhere light a candle curse the glare
Draw the curtains I don’t care ‘cuz it’s alright

I will get by, I will get by
I will get by, I will survive

I see, you’ve got your fist out, say your piece and get out
Yes I get the gist of it but it’s alright
Sorry that you feel that way, the only there is to say
Every silver lining’s got a touch of grey

I will get by, I will get by
I will get by, I will survive

It’s a lesson to me, the eagles and the beggars and the seas
The ABC’s, we all must face try to keep a little grace

It’s a lesson to me, the deltas and the east and the freeze
The ABC’s, we all think of and try to win a little love

I know the rent is in arrears the dog has not been fed in years
It’s even worse than it appears but it’s alright
Cows givin’ kerosene, kid can’t read at seventeen
The words he knows are all obscene but it’s alright

I will get by, I will get by
I will get by, I will survive

The shoe is on the hand that fits, there’s really nothing much to it
Whistle through your teeth and spit ‘cuz it’s alright
Oh well a touch of grey kinda suits you anyway
And that was all I had to say and it’s alright

I will get by, I will get by
I will get by, I will survive

We will get by, we will get by
We will get by, we will survive

We will get by, we will get by
We will get by, we will survive

What’s making us fat?

What’s making us fat?

A recent article got my attention as it connected pesticides on food we eat as a contributing factor to obesity.

The article referenced is FULL of click-bait ads, so I will not link here. It, however, links to another article w/less bait.

Quote: “More than two-thirds of the U.S. population—twice the global average—is either overweight or obese. This is typically attributed to overeating and inactivity. But evidence that pets, laboratory animals, primates, and feral cats living in industrialized human societies also are showing a rise in obesity suggests that environmental obesogens may be playing a role.

In the current study, investigators exposed human and mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and preadipocytes to triflumizole (TFZ), a fungicide widely used on food and ornamental crops. MSCs can differentiate into bone, cartilage, or fat cells; preadipocytes are precursor fat cells that mature into adipocytes in response to environmental cues. The investigators found that expression of obesity-related genes increased in treated cells from both species, and that lipid accumulation and expression of obesity-related genes increased in treated cells from both species.”

What foods are to be avoided … any fruit or vegetable that has a porous skin or rough skin that would collect pesticides and hold them in even after washing. The best tact to avoid it all – buy organic. But organic costs more, right? … poverty, socioeconomic status impacts our health as we eat cheaper (non-organic) produce.

The US CDC has some info on obesity and socioeconomic status. Quote: ‘The association between obesity and income or educational level is complex and differs by sex and race/ethnicity.

  • Overall, men and women with college degrees had lower obesity prevalence compared with those with less education.
  • By race/ethnicity, the same obesity and education pattern was seen among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic women, and also among non-Hispanic white men, although the differences were not all statistically significant. Although the difference was not statistically significant among non-Hispanic black men, obesity prevalence increased with educational attainment. Among non-Hispanic Asian women and men and Hispanic men there were no differences in obesity prevalence by education level.
  • Among men, obesity prevalence was lower in the lowest and highest income groups compared with the middle income group. This pattern was seen among non-Hispanic white and Hispanic men. Obesity prevalence was higher in the highest income group than in the lowest income group among non-Hispanic black men.
  • Among women, obesity prevalence was lower in the highest income group than in the middle and lowest income groups. This pattern was observed among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic women. Among non-Hispanic black women, there was no difference in obesity prevalence by income.”

While not all things tie back perfectly to socioeconomic status, I think safe to say: be careful what you eat; you ARE what you eat. Eat the best stuff you can afford, i.e., organic.

Bloomberg on digital marketing to kids

Bloomberg on digital marketing to kids

I found the article a bit shallow (I think their intent, however), but the issue they are poking is incredibly important. Within the US given today’s wild west days of regulatory oversight, this could balloon painfully and quickly.

Problem 1 – it’s up to the parents? Quote: “The tools exist to protect smartphone-toting children from targeted ads. Parents better start enforcing their use.”

Size of the opportunity? Quote: “By the time U.K. youngsters are 11, the ownership ratio reaches a whopping 90%, according to a report published on Tuesday by the research consultancy Childwise. And as the penetration of smartphone usage rises, it creates more opportunity for advertisers to get in front of young eyeballs. Parents need to get clued up if they want to stop that from happening.”

And yes, governments have noticed. Quote: “But regulators have also been remarkably proactive in ensuring the necessary protections are in place for youngsters. The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation makes it illegal to process the personal data of children under the age of 13, as does the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act in the U.S. Similar rules are in the works in China and India.”

Yet, the authors close with, quote: “However, that only holds up if parents are ensuring their offspring access the web through the appropriate portals”

I am not optimistic, given what I observe of either disengaged or overworked parents … a huge social experiment I wonder with only the health, well being and consumption patterns of our children at stake. Why cannot tools be all ‘on’ by default and parents would have to turn them off?

This is just the beginning

This is just the beginning

Full Quote below – https://www.axios.com/nimby-5g-neighborhoods-9e7831d0-34e7-4417-93c9-81edc0854e1f.html

The next NIMBY battle: 5G small cells in neighborhoods

The not-in-my-backyard battles may soon have a new target: 5G small cells.

Where it stands: When it comes to 5G small cell acceptance, a PwC survey of 800 consumers suggests most people are willing to deal with unsightly 5G antennas, especially if they are in someone else’s backyard.

By the numbers: 86% said they will accept small cells that “blend into their surroundings.”

  • 73% will accept small cells that don’t blend in as long as they are not directly in front of their homes.
  • 60% don’t care about aesthetics if they can have faster internet service.

“It’s one thing to see the installation of the 5G boxes on poles on a main corridor that doesn’t offend people. But if you’re in a heavily residential area and you’re not expecting to see that type of thing, it’s almost like having a power transformer in your front yard. People are not going to like those.”

— Christian Sigman, city manager of Brookhaven, Georgia

Still, consumers are excited about 5G — and willing to pay more for it — even though they don’t really know what it is, according to a recent Morning Consult poll of 5,600 adults in the U.S. and EU commissioned by IBM.

  • 49% of consumers are very or somewhat excited about 5G, but only 36% said they were even somewhat familiar with the technology.
  • 49% of U.S. consumers said they would be willing to pay more for 5G, but only 4% said they would pay “significantly” more.
  • 38% said they understand the differences between 5G and 4G, but only 7% said they understand the differences “very well.”

Between the lines: There has been a lot of hype about the promise of 5G, but consumers are still struggling with the specifics ahead of widespread rollout — and NIMBY backlash may slow down small cell construction in neighborhoods.

Bloomberg's Climate Dashboard

Bloomberg's Climate Dashboard

This dashboard is pretty interesting and a bit horrifying …

Quote: “These are the numbers that matter. A difficult global transition is happening right now, away from fossil fuels, deforestation, greenhouse-gas pollution and melting ice. It can be measured with precision and clarity. The processes described by this data dashboard are occurring on a planetary scale, and yet our progress can be measured this minute, in parts per million, in metric tons, in fractions of a degree. This is Bloomberg Green’s guide to the worldwide goal of slowing and stopping warming temperatures. This is a record of how far we have to go, and a tool to assess how much we can change.”

It updates in seemingly real time, but here’s a snapshot

Regardless of your financial, media or political affection for Bloomberg, they deserve a bunch of credit for putting this in front of us!

Is this a beginning…?

Is this a beginning…?

Quote: “An alien species visiting Earth in the year 2020 would be forgiven for assuming that humankind had succeeded in pissing off some kind of vengeful God. This month alone, mega-wildfires ripped through Australia, massive king tides swept California shorelines, and, now, billions of desert locusts have descended on East Africa in an insect storm of biblical proportions. But climate change, not an angry deity, is to blame.”